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10 Foods to Eat During Pregnancy

It’s no surprise that healthy nutrition during pregnancy makes a difference for both you and the baby. Getting enough nutrients that you and your baby need supports a healthy pregnancy and the proper development of your baby. It also helps you to enter the birth and lactation period in good health and vitality.

But which nutrients do you need most? And what are the best foods to eat? Today we will discuss 10 super healthy superfoods that provide you with important nutrients during pregnancy

It’s no surprise that healthy nutrition during pregnancy makes a difference for both you and the baby. Getting enough nutrients that you and your baby need supports a healthy pregnancy and the proper development of your baby. It also helps you to enter the birth and lactation period in good health and vitality. 

But which nutrients do you need most? And what are the best foods to eat? Today we will discuss 10 super healthy superfoods that provide you with important nutrients during pregnancy:

Table of contents

  1. Enzyme Rich Foods
  2. Green Leafy Vegetables
  3. Wild Fish and Seafood

Omega-3 fatty acids

  1. Raspberry Leaf Tea
  2. Enzyme Rich Drinks
  3. Root Vegetables
  4. Dates
  5. Organic (meadow) eggs
  6. Legumes
  7. Berries

Finally

  1. Enzyme Rich Foods

Enzyme-rich foods such as ripe pineapple, papaya, avocado, yogurt, sauerkraut, kimchi, and drinks such as homemade kefir are excellent additions to your diet. They aid your digestion while fermented foods provide your digestive system with good bacteria.

During pregnancy, digestion slows down to extract as many nutrients as possible from your diet. The downside is that many pregnant women experience digestive problems.

By eating or drinking little enzyme-rich products with every meal:

Do you support digestion?

Help your body absorb nutrients

Do you provide your intestines with good bacteria 

Take the vitamin test
10 x healthy food for during pregnancy
10 x healthy food for during pregnancy
8 minutes reading time

It’s no surprise that healthy nutrition during pregnancy makes a difference for both you and the baby. Getting enough nutrients that you and your baby need supports a healthy pregnancy and the proper development of your baby. It also helps you to enter the birth and lactation period in good health and vitality.

But which nutrients do you need most? And what are the best foods to eat? Today we will discuss 10 super healthy superfoods that provide you with important nutrients during pregnancy:

Table of contents

  1. Enzyme Rich Foods
  2. Green Leafy Vegetables
  3. Wild Fish and Seafood
    Omega-3 fatty acids
  4. Raspberry Leaf Tea
  5. Enzyme Rich Drinks
  6. Root Vegetables
  7. Dates
  8. Organic (meadow) eggs
  9. Legumes
  10. Berries
    Finally
  11. Enzyme Rich Foods
    Enzyme-rich foods such as ripe pineapple, papaya, avocado, yogurt, sauerkraut, kimchi and drinks such as homemade kefir are excellent additions to your diet. They aid your digestion while fermented foods provide your digestive system with good bacteria.

During pregnancy, digestion slows down to extract as many nutrients as possible from your diet. The downside is that many pregnant women experience digestive problems.

By eating or drinking little enzyme-rich products with every meal:

Do you support digestion?
Help your body absorb nutrients
Do you provide your intestines with good bacteria?

  1. Green Leafy Vegetables
    Leafy greens (as well as strawberries and beets) are packed with folate, the natural form of folate. Folate is incredibly important to prevent birth defects such as neural tube defects in the developing fetus.

Vegetables contain other important vitamins and minerals such as vitamins A, C, E, and K, and B vitamins.
A delicious vegetable smoothie is perfect for during pregnancy, especially if you are nauseous or can’t eat much because the baby is taking up all the space. Juice and smoothies are two ways to get a lot of vegetables in your diet. The key is to use green foods that are easy to digest raw such as: romaine and butter lettuce, cucumbers, alfalfa and endive.

The harder-to-digest vegetables such as kale, broccoli, turnip or beet leaves are better cooked or steamed or processed in a soup.

FYI, spinach is rich in oxalate (oxalic acid), which can irritate the digestive tract and strain the kidneys. Spinach is therefore preferably used in warm dishes in which it has been cooked or baked.

  1. Wild Fish and Seafood
    Wild-caught fish and seafood are packed with protein, essential fatty acids and trace elements such as iodine, selenium and zinc. All hard to find nutrients that are important during pregnancy.

Although you want to take heavy metals and other contaminants that accumulate in fish into account, eating (oily) fish is recommended for pregnant women. To avoid the risk of a listeria infection, it is recommended not to eat raw fish. 

To be sure, stick to smaller fish and seafood such as:

Wild salmon (e.g. sock-eye) – rich in omega-3 and antioxidants
Shrimp – high in iodine
anchovies
Sardines – rich in omega-3 and selenium
Trout
And oysters (cooked) – particularly rich in zinc.

Omega-3 fatty acids

Omega-3 fatty acids are polyunsaturated fatty acids. These fatty acids are essential, which means that your body cannot make them itself and that you have to get them through food. Some fish are excellent sources of omega-3 fatty acids. 

But what if you prefer not to eat fish because you are a vegetarian, for example? In that case, it is important that you get enough of the omega-3 fatty acid type alpha-linolenic acid (ALA). ALA is a plant-based form of omega-3. The body converts an average of 9% of this into the essential fatty acid EPA. Then the body converts about 3.8% into DHA.

What foods contain ALA?
Foods that contain a high concentration of alpha-linolenic acid are:

Avocado
walnuts
Chia seed
hemp seed
Seaweed
Linseed (oil) (do not heat the oil)

What is omega-3 good for, among other things?
With a daily maternal intake of 200 mg DHA, DHA contributes to the normal development of the eyes of the fetus and breastfed infants.
With a daily intake of 200 mg DHA by the mother, DHA is good for the development of the brain function of the fetus and of breastfed infants
ALA contributes to the maintenance of normal blood cholesterol levels with a daily intake of 2 grams of ALA.
DHA is good for the brain and vision with a daily intake of 250 mg DHA.
DHA and EPA support blood pressure with a daily intake of 3 grams of EPA/DHA.
DHA and EPA contribute to the maintenance of normal blood triglyceride levels with a daily intake of 2 grams per day.

  1. Raspberry Leaf Tea
    Red raspberry leaf tea is a wonderful uterine tonic and great for strengthening the muscles along the pelvic wall. This tea contains high amounts of vitamins A, B, C, E and significant amounts of minerals such as calcium, magnesium, potassium and phosphorus. Together, these nutrients strengthen and support the uterus in preparation for childbirth.

Studies have shown that red raspberry leaf tea makes labor faster and easier and reduces the chances of the mother developing complications or needing interventions.

Please note: because of the effect, it is generally recommended to drink this tea only from 34 weeks of pregnancy. Always consult with your doula, midwife, and/or doctor.

  1. Enzyme Rich Drinks
    Good digestion during pregnancy is crucial because what you absorb from your meals is so important for you and the baby’s development. To support your digestion you can drink the following drinks.

coconut water
Coconut water is literally nature’s energy drink! Coconut water is high in electrolytes, these alkalizing minerals like potassium, calcium, magnesium, and sodium can help calm the stomach and stimulate your digestive system.

Coconut water also makes enzymes and contains B vitamins and vitamin C.

Take the vitamin test

10 x healthy food for during pregnancy

8 minutes reading time

It’s no surprise that healthy nutrition during pregnancy makes a difference for both you and the baby. Getting enough nutrients that you and your baby need supports a healthy pregnancy and the proper development of your baby. It also helps you to enter the birth and lactation period in good health and vitality. 

But which nutrients do you need most? And what are the best foods to eat? Today we will discuss 10 super healthy superfoods that provide you with important nutrients during pregnancy:

Table of contents

  1. Enzyme Rich Foods
  2. Green Leafy Vegetables
  3. Wild Fish and Seafood

Omega-3 fatty acids

  1. Raspberry Leaf Tea
  2. Enzyme Rich Drinks
  3. Root Vegetables
  4. Dates
  5. Organic (meadow) eggs
  6. Legumes
  7. Berries

Finally

  1. Enzyme Rich Foods

Enzyme-rich foods such as ripe pineapple, papaya, avocado, yogurt, sauerkraut, kimchi, and drinks such as homemade kefir are excellent additions to your diet. They aid your digestion while fermented foods provide your digestive system with good bacteria.

During pregnancy, digestion slows down to extract as many nutrients as possible from your diet. The downside is that many pregnant women experience digestive problems.

By eating or drinking little enzyme-rich products with every meal:

Do you support digestion?

Help your body absorb nutrients

Do you provide your intestines with good bacteria? 

  1. Green Leafy Vegetables

Leafy greens (as well as strawberries and beets) are packed with folate, the natural form of folate. Folate is incredibly important to prevent birth defects such as neural tube defects in the developing fetus. 

Vegetables contain other important vitamins and minerals such as vitamins A, C, E, and K, and B vitamins.
A delicious vegetable smoothie is perfect for during pregnancy, especially if you are nauseous or can’t eat much because the baby is taking up all the space. Juice and smoothies are two ways to get a lot of vegetables in your diet. The key is to use green foods that are easy to digest raw such as romaine and butter lettuce, cucumbers, alfalfa, and endive.

The harder-to-digest vegetables such as kale, broccoli, turnip, or beet leaves are better cooked or steamed, or processed in a soup.

FYI, spinach is rich in oxalate (oxalic acid), which can irritate the digestive tract and strain the kidneys. Spinach is therefore preferably used in warm dishes in which it has been cooked or baked.

Do you think you eat and live healthy enough?

Take the Vitamin Test

  1. Wild Fish and Seafood

Wild-caught fish and seafood are packed with protein, essential fatty acids, and trace elements such as iodine, selenium, and zinc. All hard to find nutrients that are important during pregnancy.

Although you want to take heavy metals and other contaminants that accumulate in fish into account, eating (oily) fish is recommended for pregnant women. To avoid the risk of a listeria infection, it is recommended not to eat raw fish.  

To be sure, stick to smaller fish and seafood such as:

Wild salmon (e.g. sock-eye) – rich in omega-3 and antioxidants

Shrimp – high in iodine

anchovies

Sardines – rich in omega-3 and selenium

Trout

And oysters (cooked) – particularly rich in zinc

Omega-3 fatty acids

Omega-3 fatty acids are polyunsaturated fatty acids. These fatty acids are essential, which means that your body cannot make them itself and that you have to get them through food. Some fish are excellent sources of omega-3 fatty acids. 

But what if you prefer not to eat fish because you are a vegetarian, for example? In that case, it is important that you get enough of the omega-3 fatty acid type alpha-linolenic acid (ALA). ALA is a plant-based form of omega-3. The body converts an average of 9% of this into the essential fatty acid EPA. Then the body converts about 3.8% into DHA. Read all about the different types of fatty acids ALA, DHA, and EPA here.

What foods contain ALA?

Foods that contain a high concentration of alpha-linolenic acid are:

Avocado

walnuts

Chia seed

hemp seed

Seaweed

Linseed (oil) (do not heat the oil)

What is omega-3 good for, among other things?

With a daily maternal intake of 200 mg DHA, DHA contributes to the normal development of the eyes of the fetus and breastfed infants.

With a daily intake of 200 mg DHA by the mother, DHA is good for the development of the brain function of the fetus and of breastfed infants

ALA contributes to the maintenance of normal blood cholesterol levels with a daily intake of 2 grams of ALA.

DHA is good for the brain and vision with a daily intake of 250 mg DHA.

DHA and EPA support blood pressure with a daily intake of 3 grams of EPA/DHA.

DHA and EPA contribute to the maintenance of normal blood triglyceride levels with a daily intake of 2 grams per day.

  1. Raspberry Leaf Tea

Red raspberry leaf tea is a wonderful uterine tonic and great for strengthening the muscles along the pelvic wall. This tea contains high amounts of vitamins A, B, C, E and significant amounts of minerals such as calcium, magnesium, potassium, and phosphorus. Together, these nutrients strengthen and support the uterus in preparation for childbirth.

Studies have shown that red raspberry leaf tea makes labor faster and easier and reduces the chances of the mother developing complications or needing interventions. 

Please note: because of the effect, it is generally recommended to drink this tea only from 34 weeks of pregnancy. Always consult with your doula, midwife, and/or doctor.

  1. Enzyme Rich Drinks

Good digestion during pregnancy is crucial because what you absorb from your meals is so important for you and the baby’s development. To support your digestion you can drink the following drinks.

coconut water

Coconut water is literally nature’s energy drink! Coconut water is high in electrolytes, these alkalizing minerals like potassium, calcium, magnesium, and sodium can help calm the stomach and stimulate your digestive system.

Coconut water also makes enzymes and contains B vitamins and vitamin C .

Homemade lemonade

Lemons can aid digestion as they stimulate the gallbladder and liver, two powerful organs! Some believe that lemon juice even supports the production of hydrochloric acid.

For homemade lemonade, squeeze 1 or 2 organic lemons into a liter of lukewarm water and add a pinch of Celtic sea salt and a little natural sweetener such as beekeeper honey. Stir well and drink throughout the day. Use a straw because of the lemon juice.

Apple cider vinegar

Our grandmothers’ remedy; what is apple cider vinegar not good for? To start, add 1 teaspoon of unfiltered organic apple cider vinegar to 250 ml of water and drink ¼ of this before each meal. In consultation with your midwife, you can build up to 1 to 2 tablespoons per 250 ml of water. Also, consider using a straw when drinking here

Supplement

If the above drinks don’t help with your digestion, consider taking digestive enzymes with meals. Always consult your midwife or doctor before taking any new supplements.

  1. Root Vegetables

The ever-humble root vegetables are packed with phytonutrients and provide good fiber-rich carbohydrates. Carbohydrates, which are often demonized, are vital for good health. They offer:

The body’s energy and nutrients such as B vitamins

The intestine with indigestible fibers that serve as food for the intestinal bacteria

A tasty snack!

Go for colorful root vegetables such as beets (good for digestion and rich in folic acid), sweet potatoes, yams (rich in antioxidants and beta-carotene), carrots (rich in fiber and packed with nutrition), red onions, leeks, and garlic.

  1. Dates

These heavenly gifts from Mother Earth do more than just curb a sweet tooth. A small study, and this more recent study, showed that mothers who ate 6 dates a day in the last month of pregnancy had shorter deliveries and significantly more dilatation.

In the last 6 weeks of pregnancy, you can add 1 or 2 to a smoothie (like this Vegan Peanut Butter Cup Smoothie ) or just eat them pure of course.

Request free advice!

10 x healthy food for during pregnancy

8 minutes reading time

It’s no surprise that healthy nutrition during pregnancy makes a difference for both you and the baby. Getting enough nutrients that you and your baby need supports a healthy pregnancy and the proper development of your baby. It also helps you to enter the birth and lactation period in good health and vitality. 

But which nutrients do you need most? And what are the best foods to eat? Today we will discuss 10 super healthy superfoods that provide you with important nutrients during pregnancy:

Table of contents

  1. Enzyme Rich Foods
  2. Green Leafy Vegetables
  3. Wild Fish and Seafood

Omega-3 fatty acids

  1. Raspberry Leaf Tea
  2. Enzyme Rich Drinks
  3. Root Vegetables
  4. Dates
  5. Organic (meadow) eggs
  6. Legumes
  7. Berries

Finally

  1. Enzyme Rich Foods

Enzyme-rich foods such as ripe pineapple, papaya, avocado, yogurt, sauerkraut, kimchi and drinks such as homemade kefir are excellent additions to your diet. They aid your digestion while fermented foods provide your digestive system with good bacteria.

During pregnancy, digestion slows down to extract as many nutrients as possible from your diet. The downside is that many pregnant women experience digestive problems.

By eating or drinking little enzyme-rich products with every meal:

Do you support digestion?

Help your body absorb nutrients

Do you provide your intestines with good bacteria 

2

. Green Leafy Vegetables

Leafy greens (as well as strawberries and beets) are packed with folate, the natural form of folate. Folate is incredibly important to prevent birth defects such as neural tube defects in the developing fetus. 

Vegetables contain other important vitamins and minerals such as vitamins A, C, E, and K, and B vitamins.
A delicious vegetable smoothie is perfect for during pregnancy, especially if you are nauseous or can’t eat much because the baby is taking up all the space. Juice and smoothies are two ways to get a lot of vegetables in your diet. The key is to use green foods that are easy to digest raw such as romaine and butter lettuce, cucumbers, alfalfa and endive.

The harder-to-digest vegetables such as kale, broccoli, turnip, or beet leaves are better cooked or steamed or processed in a soup.

FYI, spinach is rich in oxalate (oxalic acid), which can irritate the digestive tract and strain the kidneys. Spinach is therefore preferably used in warm dishes in which it has been cooked or baked.

  1. Wild Fish and Seafood

Wild-caught fish and seafood are packed with protein, essential fatty acids, and trace elements such as iodine, selenium, and zinc. All hard to find nutrients that are important during pregnancy.

Although you want to take heavy metals and other contaminants that accumulate in fish into account, eating (oily) fish is recommended for pregnant women. To avoid the risk of a listeria infection, it is recommended not to eat raw fish.  

To be sure, stick to smaller fish and seafood such as:

Wild salmon (e.g. sock-eye) – rich in omega-3 and antioxidants

Shrimp – high in iodine

anchovies

Sardines – rich in omega-3 and selenium

Omega-3 fatty acids

Omega-3 fatty acids are polyunsaturated fatty acids. These fatty acids are essential, which means that your body cannot make them itself and that you have to get them through food. Some fish are excellent sources of omega-3 fatty acids. 

But what if you prefer not to eat fish because you are a vegetarian, for example? In that case, it is important that you get enough of the omega-3 fatty acid type alpha-linolenic acid (ALA). ALA is a plant-based form of omega-3. The body converts an average of 9% of this into the essential fatty acid EPA. Then the body converts about 3.8% into DHA. 

What foods contain ALA?

Foods that contain a high concentration of alpha-linolenic acid are:

Avocado

walnuts

Chia seed

hemp seed

Seaweed

Linseed (oil) (do not heat the oil)

What is omega-3 good for, among other things?

With a daily maternal intake of 200 mg DHA, DHA contributes to the normal development of the eyes of the fetus and breastfed infants.

With a daily intake of 200 mg DHA by the mother, DHA is good for the development of the brain function of the fetus and of breastfed infants

ALA contributes to the maintenance of normal blood cholesterol levels with a daily intake of 2 grams of ALA.

DHA is good for the brain and vision with a daily intake of 250 mg DHA.

DHA and EPA support blood pressure with a daily intake of 3 grams of EPA/DHA.

DHA and EPA contribute to the maintenance of normal blood triglyceride levels with a daily intake of 2 grams per day.

  1. Raspberry Leaf Tea

Red raspberry leaf tea is a wonderful uterine tonic and great for strengthening the muscles along the pelvic wall. This tea contains high amounts of vitamins A, B, C, E and significant amounts of minerals such as calcium, magnesium, potassium, and phosphorus. Together, these nutrients strengthen and support the uterus in preparation for childbirth.

  1. Enzyme Rich Drinks

Good digestion during pregnancy is crucial because what you absorb from your meals is so important for you and the baby’s development. To support your digestion you can drink the following drinks.

coconut water

Coconut water is literally nature’s energy drink! Coconut water is high in electrolytes, these alkalizing minerals like potassium, calcium, magnesium, and sodium can help calm the stomach and stimulate your digestive system.

Coconut water also makes enzymes and contains B vitamins and vitamin C .

Homemade lemonade

Lemons can aid digestion as they stimulate the gallbladder and liver, two powerful organs! Some believe that lemon juice even supports the production of hydrochloric acid.

For homemade lemonade, squeeze 1 or 2 organic lemons into a liter of lukewarm water and add a pinch of Celtic sea salt and a little natural sweetener such as beekeeper honey. Stir well and drink throughout the day. Use a straw because of the lemon juice.

Apple cider vinegar

Our grandmothers’ remedy; what is apple cider vinegar not good for? To start, add 1 teaspoon of unfiltered organic apple cider vinegar to 250 ml of water and drink ¼ of this before each meal. In consultation with your midwife, you can build up to 1 to 2 tablespoons per 250 ml of water. Also, consider using a straw when drinking here

Supplement

If the above drinks don’t help with your digestion, consider taking digestive enzymes with meals. Always consult your midwife or doctor before taking any new supplements.

  1. Root Vegetables

The ever humble root vegetables are packed with phytonutrients and provide good fiber-rich carbohydrates. Carbohydrates, which are often demonized, are vital for good health. They offer:

The body’s energy and nutrients such as B vitamins

The intestine with indigestible fibers that serve as food for the intestinal bacteria

A tasty snack!

Go for colorful root vegetables such as beets (good for digestion and rich in folic acid), sweet potatoes, yams (rich in antioxidants and beta-carotene), carrots (rich in fiber and packed with nutrition), red onions, leeks, and garlic.

  1. Dates

These heavenly gifts from Mother Earth do more than just curb a sweet tooth. A small study shows that mothers who ate 6 dates a day in the last month of pregnancy had shorter deliveries and significantly more dilatation.

  1. Organic (meadow) eggs

Eggs are an excellent and inexpensive source of protein, fat and essential nutrients for mom and baby. When you buy organic eggs, you get eggs of the highest quality and the best nutritional value. In addition, the chickens had a significantly better life than the regular cage or free-range chickens. A test found that pastured eggs (compared to conventional eggs) contained:

1/3 less cholesterol

1/4 less saturated fat

2/3 more vitamin A

2 times more omega-3 fatty acids

3 times more vitamin E

7 times more beta-carotene (the precursor to vitamin A)

In addition, eggs are a complete form of protein, and during pregnancy, you need a lot of protein.

  1. Legumes 

Did you know that the common denominator in some of the longest-lived cultures around the world is the daily consumption of legumes? And for good reason, beans are an excellent and inexpensive form of protein and fiber. In addition, they are rich in B vitamins, iron, zinc, magnesium, and potassium.

Some good legumes for pregnancy:

Lentils: Available in a variety of colors of green, black and red, this little legume is packed with nutrients. Just one boiled cup a day provides you with your daily folic acid needs, an essential nutrient during pregnancy

Chickpeas: These fibrous beans are an excellent source of vitamin B6, manganese, folate, and molybdenum. Homemade hummus is delicious, of course, but chickpeas also go well in soups and curries.

Of course, there are other good options, such as split peas and kidney beans. Switch beans and legumes occasionally to maintain a balanced diet.

  1. Berries
    Berries are small powerhouses of our diet! They are incredibly rich in antioxidants and other phytonutrients.1 Berries also contain less sugar than other fruits.

Add some frozen berries to your smoothies or eat them fresh. Choose organic whenever possible, as berries are often contaminated with pesticides. Read more about the pesticides on our fruits and vegetables here.

Finally

When we talk about the right nutrition during pregnancy, it really comes down back to basics. Pure and unprocessed food, lots of vegetables, fruit, and legumes. Supplemented with good sources of omega-3 fatty acids, fiber, and possibly full-fat dairy. Skip over-processed foods, packages, and pouches and fill your plate with natural colors.   Eat the rainbow! And you are well on your way to offering yourself and your unborn child the best before, during, and after pregnancy.

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